Our History and Purpose

A parking lot conversation gave rise to the idea for the Goosefoot Community Fund just over 20 years ago. A thriving South Whidbey community will always be our number one priority.

Founders Linda Moore and Nancy Nordhoff at a planning meeting for the Cash Store renovation.

Success through Innovation, Collaboration, and Change

One of the best things about living on South Whidbey Island is that close-knit feeling of a rural community that we all enjoy. It’s a feeling that has to do with belonging, shared values, and a strong neighbor helping neighbor ethic. It was that special sense of South Whidbey community—and a strong desire to preserve it—that gave birth to Goosefoot.

A conversation in the parking lot of Bayview Corner’s Cash Store in 1999 marked the start of Goosefoot. That historic Bayview building had fallen into disrepair. Its owners were considering selling it. And our community was in danger of losing a central gathering place and a piece of its history.

As long-time South Whidbey resident Nancy Nordhoff and her friend Linda Moore stood in the parking lot and considered Bayview without the Cash Store, they decided they simply could not let that happen.

From the beginning, however, Goosefoot’s mission was focused on much more than simply giving people a nice place to shop and mingle at Bayview Corner. Our goal was to work in partnership with our community to enhance the cultural, environmental and economic vitality of South Whidbey. We want to help make this a great place to live for all our residents—long-timers and newcomers, the well-to-do and the just-getting-by, the political left and the right, and those who fall somewhere in between.

Sometimes we lead.

Sometimes we follow.

Most often, we are collaborators and supporters working for our community’s future.

We have a unique way to approach that goal. As a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, we are responsible developers of commercial real estate property, who aim to use that property for the betterment of South Whidbey Island. This social entrepreneurship allows us to create community friendly places and to fund programs and activities that contribute to a rich and rewarding life on South Whidbey. The goal of our development efforts lies not just in what we do with the property itself—Bayview Cash Store or the Sears House at Bayview Corner or the Goose Grocer at Bayview Center—but in reinvesting revenue from those efforts back into our community.

The goosefoot plant Chenopodium

WHAT IS A GOOSEFOOT?
A goosefoot is actually a plant—of the genus Chenopodium. There are 150 varieties, many whom have leaves resembling the foot of a goose. Quinoa, beets, and spinach are edible members of the goosefoot family.

The founders wanted a name that wouldn’t commit their new organization to a specific purpose, so they looked to the plant kingdom. The name has served us well as our projects have shifted over the years.

Essential Solutions for Our Way of Life

Goosefoot is not the same organization it was when it was founded in 1999. Over the years, we have strategically shifted our priorities and programs in response to available resources and the needs of our community.

However, three things will never change: Our promise, mission, and vision.

Our Promise.

Goosefoot works together with the South Whidbey community to create essential solutions.

We address community needs, fund local nonprofits, help local businesses grow, preserve great places and connect neighbors.

Mission.

Our mission statement is currently being updated.

Vision.

A thriving, socially vibrant community on South Whidbey Island.

Goosefoot Timeline

1999

Goosefoot Formed Non-Profit Organization

Goosefoot Formed Non-Profit Organization
Goosefoot purchases Historic Bayview Cash Store and 8 acres at Bayview Corner.
1999

Cash Store Renovations Begin

A large, local crew of construction workers, artisans, and metal workers made the new Cash Store a beautiful reality.

Renovation of Bayview Cash Store and surrounding grounds begins.

2000

House Moving Program

House Moving Program

Goosefoot provides affordable housing with innovative house donation program.

 


 

Goosefoot buys 6 more acres at Bayview Corner.

2001

Improvements begin

Improvements begin

1914 Sears Kit House is moved from Greenbank Farm to Bayview Corner by Goosefoot.

2002

Sears House Renovated

Sears House Renovated

The Sears House finds new use as office and meeting space.

 


 

5 additional acres acquired at Bayview Corner.

2004

Cash Store Grand Reopening

The Cash Store today.

Grand reopening of the renovated Bayview Cash Store.

2005

Bayview Center purchased

Bayview Center purchased

9 acres purchased by Goosefoot at Bayview Center.

2008

Last Home Moved

Last Home Moved

Last home moved in Goosefoot’s house moving program.

2009

Goose Community Grocer Opens

Goose Community Grocer Opens

Goosefoot enters into a management agreement with the Myers Group to renovate the former Red Apple.

2010

Recession Challenges

The 2008 recession hits Goosefoot. Staffing significantly reduced; organizational priorities redefined  to focus on maintaining properties and running current programs.

2012-2013

Securing Our Future

Successful 2-year Partners for the Future Campaign and major loan refinance puts Goosefoot back on path of financial stability.

2014

South Whidbey School Farm Challenge Grant

Goosefoot and the Goose Grocer launch three-year $15,000 challenge grant for the South Whidbey School Farm Program.

 


 

Long overdue capital improvements and maintenance are made at Bayview Center and Bayview Corner.

2016

Goosefoot gets philanthropic

Goosefoot gets philanthropic

The success of the Goose Grocer heralds a new philanthropic role for Goosefoot as it gives grants to the Organic Farm School, Good Cheer’s Big Acre, and Whidbey Island Nourishes.

2016

Goosefoot offers business workshops

Goosefoot offers business workshops

Goosefoot begins offering business workshops in collaboration with the Economic Development Council of Island County and the Small Business Development Center of Mt. Vernon.

2017

Big Changes for Goosefoot

Big Changes for Goosefoot

Goosefoot changes its tax-exempt status from private operating foundation to Type 1 Supporting Organization in order to better fulfill its new philanthropic role. Three non-profits appoint two members each to the Goosefoot Board.

 


 

Goosefoot formalizes its new philanthropic role by starting an annual community grants program for organizations serving South Whidbey.

2017

Commercial Kitchen Collaboration

Commercial Kitchen Collaboration

Goosefoot and the Port of South Whidbey enter into a formal agreement to expand and upgrade the existing commercial kitchen at the Whidbey Island Fairgrounds.

2019

A Big Anniversary Year!

A Big Anniversary Year!

Goosefoot celebrated 20 years, the Cash Store has been renovated for 15 years, and the Goose turned 10: where did the time go?